Category: Charlotte Mason

Thomas Edison attributed much of his success to his mother's teaching.

How to Be a Good Homeschool Quitter: Part 2

Gifted students learn differently, and most learners have a primary learning style that makes teaching easier. Learning to adapt your curriculum to your student rather than trying to squash the student into a curriculum is an important part of becoming a great homeschool teacher.

How to Be a Good Homeschool Quitter: Part 1

Knowing when to drop what isn’t working, or how to supplement or adapt your curriculum is an important part of becoming a great homeschool teacher.

Three or more books for the homeschool journey: Charlotte Mason and more.

Three (or so) Books for the Homeschool Journey

Homeschooling can be challenging, but a good book can encourage and help to renew your mind. Here are three of my favorite books about family and learning.

How to Teach Your Child: Charlotte Mason’s Education Manifesto

Charlotte Mason’s Educational Manifesto declared that not only did children have a right to knowledge, but they also had an appetite for such knowledge, and that appetite, if not squelched, would motivate them to learn.

Blossoms everywhere in the spring.

Poems for Spring by Gerard Manley Hopkins and Amy Lowell

Here are two spring poems by two of my favorite poets: Spring by Gerard Manley Hopkins and Lilacs by Amy Lowell. Both are suitable for copywork and recitation. Enjoy!

Words Matter: How to Use Good Essay Models to Become a Better Writer

One of the best ways you can teach writing is to share good models. I especially like working with excellent essays, as they tend to expand not only vocabulary and usage skills, but also because they expand thought. Here’s an example.

Wintery Mix: The Carnival of Homeschooling

Here is the Wintery Mix Carnival of Homeschooling, with a healthy variety of posts on topics as varied as reading aloud, being on the bottom of the gymnastics stack, and visiting the optometrist. Enjoy!

Charlotte Mason on Copywork

Charlotte Mason recommended copywork, which she called “transcription,” as an early step in teaching language arts. In Home Education, she wrote about the value of copywork, as well as what and how to copy. I have provided her instructions and added a few notes of my own.

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